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20130118
20130118
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the studio in chicago, two days after the election, i asked cornell west and tavis smiley about the reelection of president obama. i asked them about the fact we are in the president city. he had just flown out the day before and what this next four years means. >> it is morally obscene and spiritually profane to spend billions of dollars on the elections and not have any serious discussion on poverty, trade unions being pushed against the wall, declining wages, the 1% signer doing very well. no talk about drones, dropping bombs on innocent people. we end up with such a truncated discourse as a major problems, ecological catastrophe, climate change, global warming. it was very sad. i'm glad there was not a right- wing takeover, but we in up with the republican rockefeller in black face with barack obama. so that our struggle intensifies. >> that is a pretty rough assessment of president obama. >> that is what we have. richard nixon is to the left of him on health care. richard nixon is to the left of him on guaranteed income and the same policies in terms of imperial foreign pol
%, not 52%, but 100%. >> oh, yes. after the election republicans were acting and talking like they understood why they got drubbed at the polls. not enough women and minority voters who here is the solution they came up with. hold a three-day retreat at a former plantation and hire a pollster to come in and train gop members on the fine points of seducing the female vote. now, for starters, they're saying rape is a four-letter word. don't say it. it's good advice, fellows. joining us, joan walsh, editor at salon.com and krystal ball host of msnbc's "the cycle." krystal, you ran for congress. did you have to be told not to talk about rape? did you have talking points on that? >> i don't recall anyone specifically sitting me down and saying don't talk about rape, but it was sort of understood. i don't think in the candidate training schools they normally have to go through, don't say rape, don't make women seem like they're sluts if they take birth control, don't call them prostitutes. >> although we're learning there are a number of efforts like this in terms of the gop candida
're going to talk to one of the president's top advisors sunday. the architect of his election and re-election. we'll talk to a top republican senator, roy blount of missouri. >> i think it's interesting, and you make a good point. we know the president now, and we know obviously with the gun control issue, he's plowing ahead. the interesting thing will be to see how the republicans respond to that. >> yeah. i think with this president, you know, it may turn out to be the right lesson or not, but i think he's learned playing the inside game, and we saw this on the last news conference when he talked about trying to cozy up to republicans, that meeting behind closed doors or having them over for the barbecue, it doesn't make a difference. they'll go back to as he said, to the house floor and call him a socialist. i think he feels now it's got to be more of an outside game. you can see it on gun control, he's starting to marshall a lot of the forces that helped elect him. some of the campaign apparatus to put pressure on members of congress, in the case of gun control, even red state democrats t
to business leaders as you know, since the election in particular and he has met with dozens of ceo's and business leaders and talking about the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling debate coming in the weeks ahead and you'll remember at a previous jobs council meeting, the president made a comment that back fired on him and to what jay carney said about the president and the economy. >> shovel ready was not as shovel ready as we expected. >> the reelection was in some ways for all of us here, you know, a humbling experience because it was an assertion by the electorate to said despite how hard the last four years have been on this country because of the great economic crisis that we were in when the president took office, that the steps that we've taken have been the right steps, and more work needs to be done. >> more work needs to be done. when you talk to the president's top advisors, they say he wants to act quickly after the inaugural address and state of the union coming up in february to work on key domestic issues like immigration he reform, like gun control that he's been tal
in washington, d.c. and the president-elect of the american academy of child and adolescent psychiatry. she has taught and published and barry rosenfeld is professor of psychology and director of clinical training at fordham university. he is a clinical forensic psychologist, whose recent work has focused on assessing the risk of violence in patients. i barry rosenfeld, i'd like to start right there. what's the problem that we need to understand in trying to determine in advance who might be capable of violence as we saw in new toub? >> well, the essence of the problem is that it's a needle in a stay stack. so we've got almost an infinite number of people-- i shouldn't say infinite-- a very large number of people who will fit any profile we might generate and we want to find the one person who's potentially going to be homicidal. there just isn't really a way statistically to identify or clinically to identify that person with any real accuracy. >> brown: dr. joshi, does that mean such limits we can't know what can be done? >> the issue, however, is that young children and adolescents who somet
food. i mean these are people who have mastered it. he was re-elected president of the united states with over a majority of the vote. with an economy that can only be described as suffering and troubled. so he understands the politics of it. he knows that it is an uphill fight. but the reality is and police officers will tell you as well, police chiefs in particular, is it is the impulsive end. and it's the idea of multideaths at a time which is what a gun can do. i mean it's not-- we have changed the culture in this country as as far as smoking has concerned. when i was a pfc, cigarettes were $2 a carton. now it's $9 for a pack of cigarettes and there is a stigma. we don't see smoking in movies any more. we don't see that same level of social acceptance. i mean i think the culture is part of it, no doubt about it. >> if i could just one on the politics, i think the ambitiousness of the proposals was politically savvy. because it will allow a lot of senators from marginal areas who are swinging in the mid thrill to say well i'm not for the assault weapons ban, that's too far. but i
whether henry the 8th knew anything about food. i mean these are people who have mastered it. he was re-elected president of the united states with over a majority of the vote. with an economy that can only be described as suffering and troubled. so he understands the politics of it. he knows that it is an uphill fight. but the reality is and police officers will tell you as well, police chiefs in particular is it is the impulsive end. and it's the idea of multideaths at a time which is what a gun can do. i mean it's not-- we have changed the culture in this country as as far as smoking has concerned. when i was a pfc cigarettes were $2 a carton. now it's $9 for a pack of cigarettes and there is a stigma. we don't see smoking in movies any more. we don't see that same level of social acceptance. i mean i think the culture is part of it, no doubt about it. >> if i could just one on the politics, i think the ambitiousness of the proposals was politically savvy. because it will allow a lot of senators from marginal areas who are swinging in the mid thrill to say well i'm not for the assault weapon
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12 (some duplicates have been removed)

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